VOLUNTEER WITH CVTS

CVTS was built on volunteers. The organization was started by a group of caring people who wanted to help women and their children fleeing abuse by voluntarily opening up their homes to them. Over the years, as our organization continues to grow, we still rely on volunteers to help us in our efforts to deliver services that support women, children and families across the Comox Valley in times of need.

We are grateful for the many helping hands and hearts that have donated their time, expertise and support to our organization. We can’t do what we do without you!

Volunteer roles & opportunities

There are many opportunities to get involved with CVTS. Volunteers are needed in a variety of capacities – everything from grocery shopping to selling raffle tickets at events – which are outlined in our Volunteer Information Package. For more information about volunteering at CVTS, click on the Volunteer Information Package and learn about the roles available for volunteers. 

COVID-19 & Volunteering: Currently, our regular CVTS Volunteer Program is on hold until such time it is safe to gather in groups and we can safely offer volunteer opportunities that do not put people at risk. Too Good To Be Threw runs a separate volunteer program and is always looking for volunteers to join the team. 

Volunteer with Too Good To Be Threw

Too Good To Be Threw is a social enterprise thift store owned by CVTS and designed to generate funds to support our programs. The Thrift Store is always in need of volunteers and welcomes new applications on an ongoing basis. Learn more about volunteering with Too Good To Be Threw.

VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

Meet Wayne. Wayne is a “snowbird” from Ontario who migrates west to the Comox Valley to spend his winters. Wayne and his wife have two daughters, one who lives on the Island, and they have been coming here for the past four years. He is keen to be involved with the community and has volunteered with the Roy Creek Salmonid Enhancement Project, and enjoys singing with the Just In Time and the Celebration Singers Men of Notes choirs, and visiting seniors’ residences to perform with The Singalongz.

The pandemic changed everything, and like all of us, Wayne was no longer able to do many of the activities he was doing before. In June, he learned that CVTS needed someone to deliver meals to vulnerable women, children and families across the Comox Valley. He contacted CVTS and began volunteering immediately. Working with our Outreach team and Tenant Support Worker, Wayne has been delivering approximately 50 meals per day, three days a week, to people in Comox, Courtenay and Cumberland.

We work with LUSH Valley, who prepare the meals. Every day [that I work], I go to their kitchen and pick up approximately 50 meals, then deliver them to various locations. At first, I was delivering to around 30 locations across the Comox Valley.”

It was a “confluence of things” that led Wayne to CVTS.

I had won a food voucher with the curling club and didn’t know what to do with it. I didn’t need it and wanted to give it someone who could use it. I spoke with the Manager at Thrifty Foods who said they often donate to the Comox Valley Transition Society, so I donated half of the gift to CVTS, and the other half to someone I know who really needed it.

Prior to this, Wayne did not even know about CVTS. “Being a father of two daughters, I was grateful to find out about CVTS.”

CVTS staff acknowledge Wayne for his commitment and support in delivering meals to our clients. But when offered our thanks, Wayne is quite humble about his volunteer work.

It’s so tough to do things at this time, to find things that you can do [during a pandemic] that you feel comfortable about doing. I am really grateful to do this work.

And we are grateful for you, Wayne. Thank you for doing this essential work!

LUSH Valley Chef Darby Mulligan (left) provides volunteer Wayne McMullen with the second batch of meals ready for delivery.

In solidarity

The Comox Valley Transition Society is deeply saddened to learn of the finding of unmarked graves of children at the sites of several former residential schools.

As an anti-oppressive organization working to end violence, poverty and homelessness we recognize that the residential school system was part of a larger system of racism and cultural genocide that continues to this day and continues to impact the lives of First Nations, Inuit and Metis persons and communities.

CVTS is committed to listening to, and learning from, Indigenous staff, clients and community partners and to taking action towards the implementation of recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that pertain to our work.

Click here to view some recommendations of what we can all do from the Indian Residential School Survivor Society with additions from the BC Society of Transition Houses.